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was talking about to manage overproduction. it was during the clinton administration after the u.s. joint the wto that the very controversial 1996 farm bill passed. that is a legislation that completely did away with the remaining new deal protections and it deregulating what had already begun in the 1950s and stopped all government intervention in commodity markets and eliminated all the final -- of the programs like the grain reserve and the most immediate result after that bill passed, those of you who are old enough, it was called freedom farm:farmers quickly started calling it freedom to failed. the most immediate result of the legislation was the dramatic increase in the production of commodities. all of the programs that kept the marginal land out of production which is really good for the environment were now being planted from fence row to fence row. by 1999 the price of corn was 50% above 1996 levels. fifty% below 1996 levels and full was down 41% and farmesoy was down 41% and farmers were in major economic distress. lobbying and policymakers didn't address these problems by rei
didn't do which was like having the four presidents who knew nothing about the military, clinton, obama, the younger bush who served in the military but didn't want to deal with the military and the was george herbert walker bush. so when you look at the contributions, these individuals may. it's no surprise tour in the terrible situation that we are in now because there has to be a corrective. when you look at the george herbert walker bush administration he had important people at the defense department, the secretary of defense cheney, his aides at the time for scooter libby and paul wolfowitz. this is the key in the iraq war in 2002, 2003 in the planning that took place for that more mackall was based on a tailored pattern of total destruction and outright lies and misconception. in the earlier bush administration to put together a secret paper for the defense planning guidance that talked about unilateralism so instead of taking advantage of the strategic opportunity to turn on the collapse of the berlin wall in 1989 and the collapse of the soviet union in 1991 all of the things we
differently that he didn't do, which was by having them do nothing about the military. clinton and obama and the younger bush. these four individuals made these contributions, it is no surprise that they were in the terrible situation that we find ourselves in now that has to be corrected. when we look at the george herbert walker bush administration, he had three important people at the defense department. it was based on just a tailored pattern of total deception and outright lies. they have put together a secret paper. instead of taking together a strategic opportunity the collapse of the soviet union in 1991, all of those things we didn't expect to see in a lifetime. i certainly didn't expect to see this a couple of us wrote about the problems and no one expected it to collapse like a house of cards. this opportunity you was totally not taken. it was not taken by the bush administration. there were things like the invasion of panama and one individual had been on the cia payroll for most of the time and that is a heck of a precedence to set the terms of the military. it speaks as a m
, of course we do. we have hillary clinton, you know? [laughter] she ran for president. and she is secretary of state, and we see her on the news every day. and then we have, um, you know, sarah palin was all over the place, michele bachmann, you know, these are big names. we had nancy pelosi -- we have nancy pelosi running the house. we had record gains in the senate this year. everybody's talking about how this is such an incredible, exciting election because now we have 20 senators, the most we have ever had. we have an entire state that has an all-female delegation which is new hampshire. so women are everywhere. women are everywhere in politics. and i really do think that that is what most people think. and, of course, everybody in this room knows that that is not even the slightest bit true. and, in fact, women hold 18% of the seats in congress. in the state legislatures, we've been stuck at 23% or around 23% forever. there's no movement. we used to have nine governors, we have five governors now who are women. [laughter] we have five governors who are women. and all of this places us,
history tv. defense secretary leon panetta spoke honoring former secretary of state hillary clinton. he credited her with inspiring the decision to expand the role of women soldiers in combat. chairman martin dempsey and hillary clinton also spoke. this is 40 minutes. ♪ ♪ ♪ [national anthem] ♪ ♪ [national anthem] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> please be seated. ladies and gentlemen, the 18th chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. [applause] >> secretaries, those dedicated civilian officers and our guests today from the department of state, happy valentine's day. you know, laura martyrdoms says that saint valentine was actually martyred because he was marrying soldiers who were forbidden to marry. by the roman law the day. he was a man who loved soldiers and servicemen and women. and it is fitting in that regard that we are here to honor our recent and great secretary of state, hillary rodham clinton, who herself has been an enormous champion of military servicemen and women and their families. it is my privilege to honor one of our nation's most dedicated public se
unquote in any way commiserate with the earthquake as bill clinton would soon were or that the ground would become a significant more dangerous. the rain could be bad but it isn't usually that bad. the caribbean doesn't have a monsoon. the danger of floods and landsat would be somewhat greater when hurricane season got underway but in march it was still several months to mitigate the danger. nevertheless, returning to new york, he would expand on his concerns in washington's post on writing that quote is ground seemed quote turned to mud, dangers entities. he joined the drumbeat of warnings about the approaching of the rain. aid agencies are in a race against time, but a press release. once again it was because it's the only way to get aid and donors was to create indiscriminate panic. and again, media were not amused. when the first season range are hidden from my editors rush me out too, or else, the golf course. for waiters with a waterproof notebook and headlamp and that justifies entering the mequon dealt in july. i switched, stopped to the amused greetings of two men playing car
on secretary clinton's recent testimony before congress, it is clear that the state department and the department of defense are already consulting on this review. the secretary of state's accountability review board focused on the need to ensure the state department puts greater focus on high-risk, high-threat posts as well as posts where the host nation, despite having the will to protect diplomatic facilities, does not have the capacity to protect them. in some cases, these posts are located in countries where the department of defense and the state department have assistance programs with similar objectives. these are perhaps areas where the two departments can explore whether additional collaboration is appropriate. during secretary of state clinton's recent testimony before congress, the emphasized the importance of properly resourcing u.s. africa command, afrikom reached full operational capability less than five years ago, and has been in what's called an economy of force effort to date. the events of last september race questions about the adequacy of resourcing with r
hamilton's history of womanizing. for example, bill clinton was not the first, and bill clinton was not the worse when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long, long history of it. and eliot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, these guys had nothing on alexander hamilton. and what we find is if you read, for example, letters by martha washington during those winter camps, she was tough. she was like a soldier. she didn't complain about the weather, the harsh conditions, but she did complain about one thing. there was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving with all the lady can cats, and it was noisy, noisy, noisy, and it kept her awake at night, so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. [laughter] i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house, and it was about the presidents at ease. what did they eat? what hobbies did they have of? what are their fears and hopes? or what are they like as fathers and husbands? how did their kids turn out? as another way of assessing presidential character providing us with another lens. for ex
. they ask for gifts but the tree remembers. >> host: when you hear the term bill clinton is the first -- black president of the united states what are your thoughts? >> guest: oh my. i think it's absurd personally. i think sometimes we have been denied the highest attention for so long that when people attend our church and they know the hymns or they play the saxophone reasonably well, we accord them credit that is largely undeserved. bill clinton was returning that fleeing haitian refugees who had been fleeing the military dictatorship that we armed and supported in haiti, and he cordoned the place with ships and copies people and turned them over to their killers. in rwanda, in the u.n. it was ambassador madeleine albright who has to take some responsibility for it but deaths of 500,000 tutsis in rwanda because she single-handedly obstructed do you win intervention with the support of bill clinton. when a handful of nations and the caribbean, st. lucia, dominica and a few others, banana producing nation's, had a small slice of the european market to export their finance, though cli
the sudden they change the topic to something wildly off topic. talking about fiscal clinton subtly you get electron why you hate gay people and not only do you hate gay people but here is a letter signed an stamp from ronald reagan showing that you hate gay people and you have never seen it before and don't know what they're talking about. this is completely random information. what are you saying? the answer to that is not pretend -- the initial reaction is i know what you are talking about. the human response, to the ego, i know what you are talking about, why do we deal with this? i don't know what you're talking about and if you want to talk about it, let me do the research first and we can have an educated debate from the issue. i don't discuss things i don't know about. it take off of the table immediately and if it doesn't take off of the table and they continue to press forward they look like a bully because it is the bullying tactic. you don't ask people to talk about things they don't know about. you don't ask a seventh grader to do calculus unless they are a genius at it and you
with the earthquake come as bill clinton would soon warn, or that the ground would become significantly more dangerous than it had been before the quick. the rain could be bad but it isn't usually that bad. the caribbean doesn't have a monsoon. the danger of floods and landslides would be somewhat greater when hurricane season got underway in late summer and fall, but in march there was still several months to mitigate the danger. nevertheless, after returning to near, he would expand on his concerns and washington's post, writing that the ground would soon turn to mud, dangerous, and disease. he joined the drumbeat of warnings about the approaching of the rain. aid agencies are in a race against time, read a typical press release to once again, it was as if the only way to get these groups and others to act was to great indiscriminate panic. and again, the media were not amused. when the first season rain shower hit in the corporate editors rushed me out mid-storm to come white house, the golf course. with a waterproof notebook and different and look as if i was entering the mekong delta in july. i s
by the secretary clinton. of new liberal realists who looked at the bush idealism. we caw it -- call it knew owe conservativism. it's the conservative form of idealism about democracy and transforming countries about making things better by doing lot and lots of these things. and more or less concluded that was just not going work. and that we needed to retrench and become more realist in our approach to foreign policy. so i describe this the new liberal realists because they saw themselves as rejecting the neoconservativism. it involved a essentially rejecting a lot of the liberal international stuff they regarded as kind of soft and squishy. and regarded in the same way that the conservativism realists would regard it. and that tendency is very special in one particular way. the bush realists conservative realists tend to take words very, very seriously. they think that words have ways of coming back to bite you. and so one of the features about bolton about the bush realists was there, very careful negotiables on foreign sports. if you are the liberal international' dealist, soft, switchy. wh
bill clinton signed into law the family and medical leave act. you know, there are many laws that we pass here in washington that most americans never have reason to know or care about. the fmla, by contrast, has changed this country in profoundly important ways. it has touched the lives of millions of working families. it's almost hard to imagine today but 20 years ago, before this landmark law, workers had to risk their jobs and their livelihoods when family needs arose. there was no national policy for maternity leave or paternity leave. new mothers were sometimes compelled to return to work just days after giving birth. or to quit jobs they would otherwise have liked to keep. there was no law allowing someone to take leave from work to care for an aging, potentially dying parent or to care for a child with a serious illness. families had to leave their loved ones in the hands of others or quit their jobs and face dire economic consequences. there was no policy to allow a seriously ill worker to return to work after recovering from cancer or other serious health condition. all of
to the process. so the process exists. what senator secretary clinton asked me to do soon after benghazi was to collaborate with her to make sure we can make improvements to the system. >> general, thank you for your service. mr. secretary, it's been an honor to serve in our government. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator donnelly. senator king. >> mr. secretary, and general, thank you for being here. i wouldn't like to associate myself with senator cruz's comments i regret being a first year senator and not being able to work with you. i'm in the process of hire ang legislative assistant for the committee. if you go back to california, get longing for washington. let me know. i think it's rather unlikely. >> been there, done that. [laughter] i want to followup on a question from senator mckeen. -- cain. given it was close in terms of transportation time, why was that not an option to get people there faster? was it question of who and what is at the crete pace? general dempsey? >> the bases we have in southern europe and the met mediterranean area are generally speaking have
. but what i can say is when i was offered this job by secretary clinton, the office had lost a competence of key players on capitol hill and others in the u.s. government. so i just produce a chance to start over anything probably a lot of what we are doing with the original conception. and i'm trying not to throw out the baby with the bathwater. probably nobody has said that since her grandmother died. so my feeling is they think the original intent was to be strategic and to have a policy influence. and then i think when it went through its middle stages a coordinator and never gain traction in the state department. so it then went into a kind of supplier of people, which i thought was too limited. so we've tried to recapture that want to be part of the conversation. we've been very fortunate to have the support for secretary clinton for the first year of our existing and now what we are finding that only been in a handful of meetings with secretary kerry, but in every one of the meanings, he has said, or bring the ideas. give me some out-of-the-box thinking. we've got to find another w
certainly have seen since. >> now secretary of state hillary clinton on the u.s. role in the world. she's at the council of foreign relations today for now and will meet with president from the white house tomorrow, her last day as secretary. her successor senator john kerry will be at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [inaudible conversations] [applause] [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla he'll who is with us today, the entire board of directors and their members can't i want to welcoming you to the council on foreign relations and i'm richard haas president of cfr. are those of you who don't know who we are, we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six a
, a position that this morning's test held under of another georgetown alumnus, bill clinton. our catholic and jesuit identity ask of all of us, our students as well as faculty, to seek a better, more just world. something special that we have that encourages and motivates so many of our alumni for public service. let me turn to our guest today, and alumnus of another just we university, santa clara. his early work in public service was as an aide to then thomas kidd coal of california, and as an assistant to the secretary of health education and welfare. he later became director of the u.s. office of civil rights, just a few years after the passage of the civil rights act. in the '60s, he served as an army intelligence officer and was honored with the army commendation medal. secretary panetta served in the u.s. house of representatives for more than 15 years before he became director of the office of management and budget under president clinton who was so impressed by his leadership and dedication that he asked him to serve as his chief of staff. after secretary panetta left the white h
and president clinton launched tomahawk missiles based on the intelligence from the embassies that were blown up in east africa. he launched tomahawk missiles into the sudan and afghanistan. and they hit targets to lend if you have as to any of us in this from the next morning whether america was the war, just that all of us would have said no. we fired some missiles, but we're not at war. if u.s. people is the impact of those, not missiles i think there would have a different view. so the danger is committed to a potentially lower the willingness to use force and nothing given as four. yet you build up entities, you build the people who think there are a war with you. when did al qaeda go to war with the united states? the average answer is september september 11th. al qaeda declared war in 1996. most of us did not get the memo. but they attacked the coal, east africa, they were at war with us, and there's always a danger when one side is the war and the other is not commend both ways. the danger of all of this technology is that cyber has the same potential. anytime you can sit back and relati
of his boyish, looks and youthful charm, but george stephanopoulos is a massive bully. in the clinton war room and he pretends he is an objective journalist so that he can ram his agenda that everyone's throat. this civilian -- instead of going in he says i'm not objective, you're not objective. you're gonna sit there and let me make you look horrible. of am excited to be here, happy to be here, thank you for giving me access to you and your audience. before we get started afraid to my and conservative. you're a liberal. you're somebody who is in the clinton war room, somebody who takes talking points that i want our biases out on the table. at the outset people need to know that if i am questioning the premise of your question, because i'm being combative is because you're coming from the opposite political viewpoint of mine which is a perfectly fair tactic. newt gingrich did this during the debate. you would go after the questionnaire. that is what we ought to be doing. they are running control. and if you think that the audience is stacked against you and you think it is going to be so
for upper-income taxpayers they're going to go back to clinton-era tax rates. but the point in trying to make with this one chart, this is the real world. the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves is not the real world. when one side believes one thing in one side believes the other, there is not much room for consequence. i will come back to white, and they should be part of how you think about this. why is it that the two sides believe such different things? why do one depend on evidence and the other on broad principles about the size of government, individual liberty, and so forth and so on. so let me -- i can do this. of want to go back to that. let me move on to the experience . i am sure -- you all understand, and i think most people agree that the signature issue for the bush of illustration, the ones that had the most consequence and the ones that will shape the bush administration's place in history, that tax cut and the invasion. so you can imagine how difficult these decisions were and with respect before going in a committing all those troops and hundreds of billions of d
're going to go back to clinton era tax rates. but the point i'm trying to make with this one chart is to say, this is the real world, and the idea that tax cuts pay for themselves is not the real world. and when one side believes one thing and one side believes the other, there's not much room for consequence. i will come back to why and this should be part of how you think about this stuff. why is it that the two sides believe such different things? why does one depend on defend -- evidence and the other on broad principles about the size of government individual accomplish so forth and so on. so let me -- i want to go back to that. and let me move on to the experience with iraq. i'm sure you all understand -- and i think most people would agree -- the signature issues for the bush administration, the ones that had the most consequence and the ones that will shape the bush administration's place in history -- were, one, the tax cuts, and, two, the invasion of iraq. so you can imagine how difficult these decisions were, and with respect to iraq, before going in and committing all t
, unquote in any way come miss rat with the earthquake, as bill clinton would warp though, ground had become significantly more dangerous or diseased than before the quake. the rain can be bad but not usually that bad. they don't have a monsoon. the danger of floods and landslides would be somewhat greater when hurricane season got underway in late summer and fall, but in march there was still several months to mitigate the danger. nevertheless, after returning to new york, ban would expand on his concerns in the washington post writing that, quote, the steep ground would soon, quote, turn to mood, dangerous and diseased. he joined a drum beat of warnings about the approaching of the rains. eight agencies are in a race against time, read a typical prerainy season press release by care. once again, it was as if the only way to get aid groups and donors to, a was to create indiscriminate panic and media were not amused. when the first decent shower hit my editors sent me out to the golf course in full weighedders waders and poncho, i looked like it was entering the mekong delta in july. now, n
proper income tax payers, they're going to go back to the clinton era tax relief. the point i am trying to make with this one chart, this is the real world and the idea tax cuts favored themselves is not the real world and when one side believes one thing and one side believes the other there's not much room for a consequence. i will come back to why and this should be how you think about this one. why is it that the two sides believed such different things? why does one depend on evidence and the other depend more on broad principles about the size of government and individual liberty and so forth and so on? let me if i can do this, let me go back and let me move on to the experience with iraq. you all understand most people would agree the signature issue for the bush administration, the one that had the most consequence and the ones that will shape the bush administration's place in history, tax cuts and invasion of iraq. you can imagine how difficult these decisions were and with respect to iraq before going in and giving hundreds of billions of dollars you can imagine it took a lot
in policy and ran successfully? >> bill clinton is the most obvious. he writes out in the 16th year he decided it is an amazing experience because people are so interested to make a difference and me involved it is the most unfortunate experience but is exhilarating to not to want to do it again. >> host: tallis about your experience. where were you? what was the primary? >> guest: 2006 democratic primary road violence second congressional district the incumbent had was there for a while and prior to that was secretary of state and he is still in congress. the main reason iran is i felt he is not representing the district on the issues and that was important we were two-thirds pro-choice and voted 27 times against that. also we authorizing a egregious provisions of the pager fact, he was not very outspoken about the of war in iraq and i thought people of rhode island were not being represented by it rarely does the establishment feel the candidate can go against someone so i felt i had to do it. i have just written by a first book so i was very aware of the limitations and because i wa
institute, were not capable of doing that. that's a historic reality. in the 1990s when bill clinton said there's an election based on that, it was the house and senate that legislative sanctions on iran, the push for, like it or not, freedom for the iraqi people to push for sanctions on cuba, to push her more engagement and exactly which are talking about, that really pushed for in a relationship with india. i could go on and on. nato expansion. all the things taken for granted but not in initiative. they're members of congress on capitol hill who change the world in a very meaningful way and that's still an opportunity if we recognize we need to care about. sorry for that little speech. >> how do we know kind of the counterterrorism, is very much her? [inaudible] >> the question is how do we know when we've won? >> were in no danger of women anytime soon. this has become a sugarless because it's a fair question obviously. what you measure for success and how do we know when we stopped, and that we are so far away from that now a more further away than when this president took office in
part of the research for me as a couple of years ago i got a letter from now former president clinton and i'm going to send him one of the books and then i got one of the craziest best fan letters i have forgotten my whole life. it came from former president george h.w. bush. he read one of my novels the billionaires and asked if i would sign a copy for him. you are a leader of the free world, you will get a free book. whatever you want you have rented. you are the president. terry nice. i spent time with the bushes there and barbara and george are the sweetest and nicest people. they spent the first half hour of iowa's with them it was president bush trying to commence my wife that he invented the -- that is quality material. that's a good joke. he did not invent the phrase you are the man. he might have but the nice part was as i was researching this book i got to ask president bush questions about the white house and his time there and listen i write fiction. i can write anything i want but we all know that there are only a few people on this planet who know what it's like to live
because they did not support the surge can after hillary clinton and, barack obama, get after the entire joint chiefs of staff at the time who were all against the surge. you can make the case it works in the tactical way and it did cost a lot of money and a thousand extra soldiers died was that worth it? i don't know. but it is not a clear-cut fact that we won. but the jewish lobby question, the israeli press we refer to the jewish lobby there has been this thing going for years anybody to chris -- criticizes israel your anti-semitic you're talking about jews, not brazil -- israel. it is playing with words. i knowed jews in nebraska that never got any sense of anti-semitism the last three years has been president of mama's chair intelligence advisory board i have talked to people who have sat at meetings with them and i have been told that they have no dog in the fight there was no deal logical tilt with questions of iran's nuclear program. and the quality of the answers under questioning is kind of pathetic, but i don't know. i am sure the votes are lined up for him to win but you don'
years ago, i got a letter from former president clinton, writing about one of the books because someone sent him one of the books. and then i got one of the craziest, best fan letter is ever got from former president george h.w. bush, and he read one of my novels, the millionaires, ask asked if i would sign a copy of it. i said, you're the leader of the free world you get a free book. whatever you want. you're the president. and very nice, has me out to houston. i spend some time with the bushes there, and barbara and george are the sweetest people. they spent the first half hour we were with them, it was president bush trying to convince my wife he invented the phrase "you the man." and that's a good joke. my wife said, did you know he invented the phrase -- i said he did not invent the phrase pow you the men." but i don't know. he's the president. but i got to ask president bush questions about the white house and his time there, and i write fiction. i can make up anything i want. but we all know that there are only a few people on this planet who know what it's like to live in the wh
who would later ron go to work for secretary clinton to go and start thinking about did we want to even help people to use social media to democratize. so he created groups of friends, for instance people who would help overthrow terrorism and columbia who could chat with people in the middle east who were trying to deal with terrorism, as a week starting to use the social media. but i am trying to understand now read is an accelerant, it isn't the cause of the trend but it is an accelerant to read what is interesting is what is happening in the social media in china because the regime is doing everything it can to control the internet. it's terrified of the internet and in fact packing into the servers to try to find that last human rights advocate and the social media is going wild in china and the regime isn't so certain that maybe it's not a bad thing that people have a way to vent through social media so you remember the story of the girl that was run over in the streets, that exploded into the social media in china but i would say to the regime it's one thing people will j
is a couple years ago, um, i got a letter from now former president clinton writing about one of the books was someone had -- because someone had sent him one of the books, and then i got one of the craziest, best fan letters from former president george h.w. bush x. he read one of my normals, and he asked -- novels, and he asked if i would sign a copy for him. i'm like, you're the leader of the free world, you get a free book. you're the president. very nice. has me out to houston, i spend some time with the bushes, and barbara and george are like the sweetest, nicest people. they spent the first half hour that we were with them president bush tried to convince my wife that he invented the phase you the man, right? that's a good joke. and my wife's like, do you know he invented the phrase you the man? i'm like, he did not. although he might have, i don't know, he's the president. but the nice part was as i was researching this book, i got to ask president bush questions about the white house and his time there. and, listen, i write fiction. i can make up anything i want, right? but we all
they business. the real big event happened in the summer night 299 were bill clinton made a really mandatory, although it come back a few years. he said freddie mac and fannie mae has to have at least half your loans in affordable housing i.e. subprime lending. that was a dramatic announcement because of the size of freddie and fannie. a number of economists identify the risk involved in this issue and said listen, danny and freddie are so big that there's no way they can meet this goal without radically reducing lending standards in the home mortgage business. so it is not that big. if they achieve that goal, they're taking so much risk that studying for any candidate in financial trouble and they are so big they can take a couple u.s. financial system. nine years later it has been. what freddie and fannie failed, the outside trying dollars and they had $2 trillion in subprime mortgages. even before they failed, they would average 1000 to one. it would be like you having a net worth of $10,000. the only way you can do that is if the government guarantees your debt and this is something way
hillary clinton on the u.s. role in the world. she was at the council on foreign relations today for an hour and will meet with president obama and the white house tomorrow her last day of secretary. her successors and it should john kerry opie at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla hills who is with us today and the entire board of directors and the members i want to welcome you to the council on foreign relations. i'm richard haas president of the cfr. for those of you who don't know who we are we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to h
of state, the inimitable mrs. clinton who has been allied and a partner and certainly viewed very well in pakistan as the most important and powerful diplomat representing the united states fears abroad. we welcome john kerry because pakistan knows john kerry as the architect -- one of the architects of the kerry lugar berman legislation, which has been instrumental in broad-based in this relationship and anchoring it and we hope a longer and more sustainable multifaceted relationship. we also know that it's not a relations transcends personalities as well as political parties. we work and we hope to work with every senior policymaker in the united states as well as congress and senator kerry has emerged from those ranks. we look forward to working with him and i don't think we need to speak to anyone. he has worked his policy agenda and i'm sure he has a great deal to address as he takes this important and challenging task. >> as you know, your foreign minister did a talk at the council on foreign relations moderated by david sanger of "the new york times" and while they are in terms
, rob. now if professor at the harvard business school and fha commissioner in the clinton years was certainly one of the most value for players on the commission. i also want to note the presence of former secretary of hud alphonso johnson -- off onto jackson and if you would please stand and let us recognize you. [applause] it's my honor to turn the podium back to senator george mitchell. >> six years ago when howard baker tom daschle and i came together to establish the bipartisan policy center through the initiative of jason coombe may, we were dismayed at the extent to which our political process appeared to be in gridlock as a consequence of excessive partisanship and ideological posture. that concern remains and it is heightened today. and american politics has been rough. i frequently cite the example of the presidential campaign of 1800, when jefferson supporters called president adams a hermaphrodite lacking they said the strength of a man or the gentleness of a woman. adam supporters responded that the murder rape and robbery would be taught and openly practice in our
the aircraft carriers that i need or even bill clinton, saying that i am not going to attack saddam hussein's intelligence headquarters as he did when clinton was president, because in some budget document under the constitution, the president and his commander in chief, we now have the president going because of this piece of paper in this agreement and i can't do what i need to do to protect the country. that is a kind of madness that i have not seen in a long time. >> bob woodward is a different understanding of how money works on the rest of us. in other words, if you don't have the money, you have to figure out how to adjust. that is a nice little sentiment that somehow ronald reagan would've been able to adjust and make money appear out of thin air and pay for things. but to send out an aircraft carrier, it costs a certain amount of money and everything else that goes into it. as part of the whole strategy, the resources that we have available, what will should we do to make decisions about where to spend that money. some of the money is now able to be spent so that the next group of
, but -- [laughter] he's a massive bully. he was in the clinton war room, and now he pretends he's an objective journalist. that's what george stephanopoulos does, that's his entire shtick. instead of going in there and playing on his terms and playing on his terms, we need to reverse the polarity. his polarity is i'm objective, you're not objective, i'm going to ask you questions and make you look horrible, and you're going to sit there and let me make you look horrible. before he says anything say, george, look, i'm really excited to be here, i'm really happy to be here, thank you for giving me access to you and your audience, really appreciate it. before we get started, i just want to point something out to the audience. i'm conservative, i say it openly. george, you're a liberal masquerading as an objective journalist. you're somebody who was in the clinton war room, you take talking points from the bole administration. so we can have a perfectly nice and simple conversation, but i want our biases on the table at the outset. if i am questioning the premise of your question, that's not becau
bill clinton was president. we not only balanced the budget, but we left george w. bush a surplus of $281 billion. and by the way, i happened to be here when we voted on the budget plan and we did not have one vote to spare. we did it ourselves. now, what did george w. bush do with this surplus, this huge surplus? he squandered it. he put two wars on the credit card, never paid for it, gave tax breaks to people who didn't need it and handed president obama a $1.2 trillion deficit, which is now projected to be $850 billion for 2013. it's going in the right direction under a democratic president. now, we want to get that down and we can get that down, and we can work together to get that down, but we do not have to do this sequester. history has shown us that the balanced approach we used when bill clinton was president of smart investments and things that help our people like job training and education and lifting up our children and making sure they don't go hungry, those kinds of investments pay off in a society. we had 23 million jobs. under george w. bush, we lost jobs. and thi
to eradicate coca back in the amazon. and so the last i heard was, i think it was president clinton, who said -- the dea was asking to release this fungus in the rain forest. president clinton said no at the time. the last i heard in 2007 was that they're still looking into ways of using the fungus as eradication. it sounds iffy to me, releasing a fungus into a rain forest. i think that's kind of an interesting way of seeing how these privileges are afforded to some powerful factors and not to others. i wanted to throw that in. >> i would just add real quick, first, on the brazilian fungus thing, one of the great experts on this has didn't a lot of research, is sitting in the audience. but on the question of the u.s. embassy, the u.s. embassy's own web site used to recommend to travelers in la paz to have coca tea. how many have been to la paz? it's about 13,000 feet high, and the airport, which is a plateau above the city, is even higher. so the oxygen content is 40% also at sea level. so you suffer terrible alt altitude psychness, extreme fatigue, headaches and you don't want to do anything
-span radio, and c-span.org. >> new york city mayor michael bloomberg and former president bill clinton spoke monday at a funeral for mayor. he served three terms as the city's mayor from 1970 to 1989 dive friday from congestive heart failure at the age of 88. this is 20 minutes. >> to you and the entire family i come today with the love and condolences of almost eight and a half million new yorkers who are grieving with you at this moment, although aid has to be loving all this attention. and i was particularly thrilled that he picked my neighborhood quarter shore for his sendoff. president clinton, governor cuomo, pataki, spitzer, schumer, gillibrand, city and state, federal and irrational officials and dignitaries, friends, family, and fellow new yorkers, everyone is here today. the thing there is no doubt that it is looking down on all of us assembled here be amended think it is fitting that he picked this place just a few blocks from a certain east river span. before last year's state of the city speech if you remember we ran a video and included a shot of ed standing at the entrance ram
clinton for secretary of state. in that instance, russians were likewise raised about potential foreign funds. and secretary clinton did something quite admiral. she voluntarily disclosed every foreign donation in the clinton foundation even though the committee rules didn't require, because there was a reasonable question that would be raised if foreign funds have gone to that foundation. i would suggest those two paths are both reasonable passed today. not one, if reasonable questions are raised about financial topics of interest in a sense of measures he could position, of the receipt of foreign funds, one position is to say i won't make that disclosure and i will withdraw from a nomination. and i will point out henry kissinger was for an advisory board, not to be the chief civilian officer of the foreign -- or the second round is to provide disclosure in have to make clear there is not a form conflict of interest. senator hagel's response is truly unprecedented. i am not aware of any president would questions have been asked is a form conflict of interest with the nominee has said i
because we were asked to go to iraq, myself, senator lieberman and senator clinton is to see if we could push them to make sure we got the legal protections for the troops. i am with the president on this in the status of forces agreement. he was absolutely right to insist on that but when the prime minister maliki said how many are you going to recommend you said i believe we are still working on that. i was a little bit astonished because it's not that the general didn't know what he needed. it's just nobody would tell him what they were going to prove. so i just want people to be clear that general austin always had a firm view that we needed 18 to 20 is what he first said. it may be more than the political market can bear because i am not sensitive to that your back,, so he kept putting pen to paper, and i know very well what you are making the best recommendation is that you could, so my problem is not you, general austin. you put the numbers to paper, and at the end of the day we have none and i just want to put into the record a load of articles about a lot. a lot has returned to
an interest in policy and ran for office successfully? >> guest: well, i think bill clinton is the most obvious example. um, he writes in his memoir that sometime in his 16th year he decided that politics was the real calling for him. and so at that point he became very cognizant of the idea that he wanted to run, and he began looking for electoral opportunities. so when he was in his open 20s and there was an open congressional seat in arkansas, he figured that was a good time to throw his hat into the ring. and he thought even if he lost that race, there would still be a good shot, that he would perform well enough not to ruin his political career. and sure enough, he lost the race, but he ultimately ran for attorney general and won, he game governor and then, obviously, president. >> host: so if somebody loses their first race, how much of a turnoff is that to them? >> guest: i don't think it's that much of a turnoff. that's not my major focus of research, i'm interest inside why people do it in the first place. i ran for congress. i ran in rhode island's 2nd congressional district i
are william jefferson clinton come extremely popular yourself, you are in trouble with the public and the congress is in the process of falling to republicans. do the right they never wanted to set and a small and cheap for us to strike down the genocide or alternatively, do you forego justice and preserve your own political position by instead staying out of rwanda and remembering the public was still pretty mad about the debacle in somalia. that question answers itself, just as traded off against each other. >> host: what about the book? >> guest: b.c. an extraordinary black-and-white struggle. this is not for people who like shades of gray in the third three treacherous villains. at the same time the response in the penultimate struggle between good and evil, they are entrenching characters who have twists and turns and then benefit wanted to concentrate on someone, probably the race place to start is column/spiegel, the most interesting and asset character in the book. >> host: let's address a black-and-white issue because this is the case for scholars like me, we want to get
the president and others. another chapter discusses hamilton's history of womanizing. bill clinton was not the first and he's not the worst. john edwards, these guys, they have nothing on alexander hamilton. we'll be fine, he said. she didn't complain about one thing. [inaudible] i did read a book called life in the white house, and it was about the president at ease. what are their fears and hopes and what are they like as fathers and husbands. another way of providing us a glimpse into presidential character. he sometimes wore a black suit to do this. the affairs of state, i have tried to take a different perspective. we all know about george washington. we study washington with brilliant and delaware on christmas night during the revolution. we find that the teenage washington, on more than one occasion, basically goes back home in fear because he puts pen to paper and he writes. he once wrote a poem in yet another girl turned him down. we all understand and know that our country's leaders have been shaped by the hand of a woman, often the mother, and i'm here to tell you that s
primary vote was more in sync than senator clinton was for the democratic party base, and she obviously senator santorum didn't have the formidable apparatus, he didn't have the body weight -- >> do you think if santorum had had perry's early money it's a different -- >> well, i think it's -- what do we know about the republican party? it's increasingly evangelical, southern and populist. what do we know about mitt romney? [laughter] i think that is a testament to his political skill, that he didn't begin this with a natural, geographical or ideological base. and yet he was able particularly in those debates through, i think, sheer political skill to -- taking positions that in many cases people disagreed with. like health care. but to convince the republican party that he had the qualities that they wanted to be their nominee. >> what would you gees seeing in your -- you gees seeing in your debates where every year it was the new whack-a-mole, conservative challenger. so we went from perry to herman cain next? herman cain was next, right? in that sort of moment, and then he blew up at
administration and led really by secretary clinton of new realist to the that the bush idealism. what caught neoconservatives and in foreign policy, but it's the conservative form of idealism about democracy, transforming countries, making things better by doing lots and lots of things. and to more or less conclude that it's just not going to work that we needed to retrench can be more realistic foreign policy. i describe this because they saw themselves as rejecting neoconservatism, but at the same time essentially rejecting liberal internationalists that they regarded as soft and squishy in much the same way conservative realists would regard it is not dangerous to american power and sovereignty. that tendency is very special in one particular way. the bush realists, conservative realists tend to take words very, very seriously. they think that words behind. they think words have ways to come back and bite you. so one of the features about the bush realists who is they are very, very careful negotiation over farmed birds. if you are the liberal internationalist, lots and lots of its talk a
third president. started at omb under president clinton, worked there under the administration of george w. bush and is now special assistant to the president and white house cybersecurity coordinator, section 8, part d. the secretary of department of homeland security shall coordinate establishment of a set of incentives designed to promote participation in the program. how do you envision those incentives? >> guest: so i think what we're really looking for is a broad set of potential incentives that could encourage companies to adopt a framework. and one of the things that we discovered as we were working on the executive order is that there's a lot of possibilities, but there's not as much work has been done to develop those into concrete incentives. so part of what the executive order is designed to do is to flesh those out. and that could range from, you know, you could imagine a whole range of incentives, right? sort of a good housekeeping seal of approval, right? companies could use in marketing to say that they're actually following cybersecurity standards all the way up to poten
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